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Hoops come in many sizes, weights, and materials. To find your perfect hoop, knowing what you want to get out of hooping is important!
Here are a few of the most common styles of hooping along with the recommended sizing:

Used for on and off body dance and tricks. Hoops sizes vary depending on preference!

 

Tubing Material: PE, Polypro or HDPE

Tubing width: 5/8", 11/16" or 3/4"

Diameter: varies from around 25"-36"

 

Sizing: Very dependent upon personal preference. I consider anything 31"-35" as the 'safe zone'. Weight, height, physical ability and end goals are big deciding factors here! If you intend on doing a lot of on-body moves, consider a thicker/heavier tubing like 3/4" PE or HDPE. If you want to do contact rolls, consider a lighter but thicker tubing with more surface area like 3/4" poly or HDPE. If you want something easier on your wrists, consider 5/8" poly or HDPE.

Hoop Dance

( photo: @dizzyflowfairy )

Juggling with 2 or more hoops. Hoops range in thickness and diameter.

 

Tubing material: Polypro or HDPE

Tubing width: 5/8", 11/16", or 3/4"

Diameter: generally ranging from 18"-28"

Sizing: Juggling hoops can vary in size. 11/16" polypro has been a popular pick lately because they are thin (easier to hold multiple hoops in 1 hand) and heavy (easier to control tosses, especially on windy days!) Big hoops have a shorter flight time (not in the air as long) but small hoops can be harder to catch/control.

Hoop Juggling

( photo: @liljuggle )

Fire hoops can have wicks on the outside (generally 2-6) or wicks on the inside (generally 1-3; also known as an iso fire hoop) Hoops range in thickness and diameter.

 

Tubing material: Polypro or HDPE

Tubing width: 5/8", 11/16" or 3/4"

Diameter: ranges anywhere from 20"-36"

Sizing: Adding wicks to any hoop is ultimately going to increase the hoop's diameter and weight. It is often encouraged to get a diameter a couple of inches smaller than your regular hoop to account for the length of the wick's spine.

Fire Hooping

( photo: @sarakathryn93 )

Used for on and off body tricks and tech. Hoops are generally thin, light and bouncy.

 

Tubing Material: Polypro

Tubing width: 1/2", 5/8", 11/16" or 3/4"

Diameter: usually 33" and smaller

Sizing: Very dependent upon personal preference. Weight, height, physical ability and end goals are big deciding factors here! If you intend on doing a lot of on-body moves, consider a thicker/heavier tubing like 3/4". If you want to do contact rolls, consider a thicker tubing with more surface area like 3/4". If you want to execute tricks super fast, consider 1/2" or 5/8".

Trick/Featherweight

( photo: @techswan )

Used for on-body hooping with multiple hoops. Hoops are generally thick and bigger in diameter.

 

Tubing material: Polypro or HDPE

Tubing width: 11/16", 3/4" or 7/8"

Diameter: ranging from 32"-36"

Sizing: Whatever size you can easily waist hoop with is generally a good size for multiple on-body hooping, maybe an inch or 2 bigger. The thicker the tubing, the more surface area for contact with your body. The heavier the hoop, the easier it is to keep it up!

Circus Style

( photo: @messsmerizing )

Combines hula hoop stretches with a with a series of Yoga-like stretches. Hoops range in size and weight.

 

Tubing material: Polypro or HDPE

Tubing width: 11/16" or 3/4"

Diameter: generally ranging from 32" to 36"
 

Sizing: Hoops for yoga vary in size depending on what types of stretches will be performed and how flexible the person is. You generally want a hoop that is easy to waist hoop with. If you raise the hoop above your head and then drop it down behind you, your shoulders should rotate backward at the same time without any pain or struggle. Bigger hoops are usually used at first and decrease in diameter as flexibility increases over time. 

 

Hoop Yoga

( photo: Jessica W )

Used for core, cardio & toning exercises. Hoops are generally thick, heavy and 'slow'.

Tubing material: PE
Tubing width: 3/4", 7/8" or 1"
Diameter: ranging from 35"-45" OD

 

Sizing: For your diameter, the general rule of thumb is to measure the height from the floor up to your belly button. Heavier/thicker tubing is often suggested because 1) it helps you maintain momentum and 2) the larger the surface area, the more contact it makes with your body. If you want more of a challenge, try a smaller diameter and a thinner tubing!

Fitness Hooping

( photo: @jmehaze )

Using 2 or more hoops for tricks that involve technical patterns and manipulations. Mini hoops (24" or smaller) are often used but bigger hoops can also be used.

 

Tubing material: Polypro or HDPE

Tubing width: 5/8", 11/16" or 3/4"

Diameter: ranging from 18" to 30"

Sizing: The smaller/thinner the hoop, the harder to control. The thicker/bigger the hoop, the harder to fully execute patterns. Heavier hoops may also be harder on your wrists. If you want to do triple or quad tech, a thinner tubing like 5/8" makes it easier to hold 2 hoops in 1 hand. If you want to do more contact rolls, consider a wider tubing like 3/4" for more surface area. Every size has its advantages and disadvantages. You probably won't know what you like until you try!If you want super small (aka 'micro' minis) and want to be able to do buzzsaws/other tricks inside the area within your wrist and chest (if your arms are straight out in front of you), measure the distance from your wrist to your shoulder. Thinner tubings like 1/2" and 5/8" work best for micros.'Average' mini sizes range from 20"-24". They're small enough to do patterns in front of you but big enough to maintain momentum.

Hoop Tech/Manipulation

( photo: @mikeythrowsshapes )

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